Canoe-dling in a Packa Shack

So, getting up close & personal in our tailgate awning or getting out in your canoe or kayak and getting changed ready to head out onto the water or once you’re back from your adventure and getting changed and dry before heading home after a great day out in the water.

Packa Shack extends the space your vehicle offers, giving you shelter and privacy wherever you and your vehicle can get too.

The Shack also lets you extend your experience by offering you a space to hang out after your trip and shoot the breeze with your fellow paddles over a cuppa before heading home or off to your next watery adventure.

Whether you prefer sea kayaking around our beautiful coastline or running the rapids on one of our many fantastic rivers, the Shack will enhance and extend your experience.

The Shack has attended a number of outdoor events this year including those organised by the Scottish Canoe Association, and we’re going to be at the Grandtully Division 1 Double Slalom organised by the Forth Canoe Club on the 27th & 28th August with the fully range of Shack for all you paddlers to try on for size and see what Packa Shack can offer you.

Double Slalom Canoe

So, for the uninitiated amongst us, here is Packa Shack’s duffer’s guide to canoe slalom…

  • Canoe slalom is a race against the clock through a combination of up and downstream gates on a whitewater course.
  • The course length and number of gates varies with a maximum of 25 gates and length of 300 meters.
  • The course is set with a mix of upstream and downstream gates; each presents a unique challenge for the athlete, significantly testing their ability to read and work with the water flow whilst maintaining their trajectory, balance and speed.
  • The direction the athlete must travel through each gate is indicated by colour: red for upstream and green for downstream.
  • The difference between a kayak and a canoe is simple; it’s the number of blades on the paddle and the athlete’s position in the boat.
  • In kayak, the paddler is seated and uses a double-bladed paddle pulling the blade through the water on alternate sides to propel the boat forward.
  • In canoe, the paddle has a single-blade and the athlete is strapped into the boat with their legs bent at the knees and tucked under their body.